Saturday, June 23, 2012

PENTATONIC SCALES FOR GUITAR: A Brief Introduction.

PENTATONIC SCALES FOR GUITAR: A Brief Introduction.  

The lesson below should help you understand exactly what the PENTATONIC SCALE is, what MAJOR and MINOR PENTATONIC scales are and how you can play them in all 5 positions in any key anywhere on the neck.

If it doesn't make any sense to you or you just want to know about any new stuff, then follow me on FACEBOOK and I'll try and answer any questions and help out.







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THIS CONTENT BELOW IS AVAILBLE TO BUY AND KEEP FOR LEFT AND RIGHT HANDED GUITAR. CLICK THE LINKS FOR DETAILS AND HELP KEEP THE BLOG GOING!









THE CONTENT BELOW IS AVAILBLE TO BUY AND KEEP FOR LEFT AND RIGHT HANDED GUITAR.CLICK THE LINKS FOR DETAILS AND HELP KEEP THE BLOG GOING!





























THIS CONTENT BELOW IS AVAILBLE TO BUY AND KEEP FOR LEFT AND RIGHT HANDED GUITAR. CLICK THE LINKS FOR DETAILS AND HELP KEEP THE BLOG GOING!


35 comments:

  1. Hy Rob,

    Thanks for the explaining, I only got to page 10 and learn alot more then all the books i seen till now. It finally make sense.

    Regards,
    Ben

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ben,
      I'm really glad you found it helpful, and do please pass on a link to any friends you think might like it as well.
      Thanks for the feed back.

      Rob

      Delete
  2. cool, very exhaustive & helpful. thanks for all the trouble, this needs to be more popular, it deserves to be

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks very much.
      I'd really appreciate any traffic you can send my way, so please pop a link out on your facebook or what ever if you have found it helpful.
      -Rob

      Delete
  3. Rob - I have played for over 35 years, this is the most comprehensive list I have seen online. Nice work.

    I will link to this on my sites.

    Thanks,

    Scott
    https://www.facebook.com/ScottGuitarBounty?ref=ts&fref=ts

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Scott,

      Thanks for the comment.

      Glad you like it.

      I was a little afraid it might have been too comprehensive for a lot of people, a little overwhelming maybe, but I think starting with the basic pentatonic box was a way to grounding it by starting with something most people are familiar with.

      I've been quite quiet because of work lately, but subscribe, or follow me on facebook if you want some more resources, because there's lot's more stuff to come when I can get my head down again and write some resources again.

      -Rob

      www.facebook.com/robsilvermusic

      Delete
    2. ...and thanks for the links, any traffic you can drive to the blog is REALLY appreciated.

      Delete
  4. I found this really useful, thanks a lot. I came via Wikipedia.

    ReplyDelete
  5. this is awesome
    now if i can just get my figures and my knowledge to mingle
    would love to see some video mixed to practice along with
    thx for the great work

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the tricky part :-)

      Good luck dude!

      Delete
  6. Best explanation I have ever seen. Great work man!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, I'm glad you found it helpful!

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Michael,
      I'm glad you think so.
      Feel free to share the link anywhere you can and spread the joy.
      thanks for checking it out anyhow.
      -Rob

      Delete
  8. Great job Rob! I finally understood it. You must have put in a lot of work. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Again Rob, just to reiterate what everyone has mentioned; tremendous detail and patient build up in the explanation. I just need to go over the major pentatonic again - the minor pentatonic was great to absorb to understand better.
    Thanks again

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No worries, and say hello on facebook if you need any more help.

      www.facebook.com/robsilvermusic

      Delete
  10. Rob, I just found your material; now I need to buy a guitar. But, I wanted to explore notes and scales first. This is great material and I'll be back. Question: Is there a missing b3 on the page 15, position 2 illustration?

    Brad Reid

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brad, YES THERE IS!!!
      Good spot. Thanks for that.
      I'll get that amended this evening.
      -Rob

      Delete
  11. This is the best. Finally someone explains what everything means and why! It has driven me nuts that no one has been able to explain the underpinnings of things like thirds and fifths. I'm finally beginning to understand music! Thanks a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Beginner trying to make sense of diagram 1 on page 36. I think I finally am starting to understand. Question: should the number 4, which I think is a Bflat be labeled b4?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No.
      The 4 refers to it being a 4th from the root note.
      The flat in Bb is the name of the note.

      Delete
  13. Rob,
    Thank you for this, it is by far the best explanation of the neck I have found on the net...legend.

    Cheers mate
    Rich NZ

    ReplyDelete
  14. I just found this. It's great! This clarifies the picture I have in my head. The confusion is clearing. I'd like to suggest a way to make learning putting the 5 positions together fun. What I did was found a way up and down the neck only skipping one fret between notes. So... to start going up use position 5 on the 6th string then on the 5th use pos. 5 and 1 then pos. 1 on 4th string and 3rd string then graduate to the 2nd pos. on the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string. Hope I said that right.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. very interesting oldieBG, how do you start on any other than the 6th string? when you start on say the 3rd string, you must have to start somewhere in the middle of the position, right? hmm, something for me to think about. An extra degree of difficulty that I have to wrap my head around. Thanks for keeping me awake tonight thinking about that....lol.

      Delete
    2. Frank. Just playing around with this idea leads to undiscovered pasterns in my head. The more I do it the more I discover. Guess it's called practice but I think it's fun. When I started doing this I didn't know there was numbered positions so, they didn't confuse me. When I found this page it really came together. To answer your question just pick any note on the neck make it the root of the scale (major or minor) and find your way up and down skipping only one fret at a time. Of course compensating for the half step difference on the second string.

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    3. OldieBG, I have to think about and then try what you just wrote about. But a thought I just had was if I can pick any fret on the neck as the root scale, then go three to the b3, (flat third) it then seems to me that any note could be the flat third, it just depends what note I pick as the root note? am I right? so my thinking is, what exactly is a flat third? as it seems to me that any note can be made a flat third? is that right? thanks, Frank

      Delete
    4. Frank. When I hear flat third I think, ok now that makes a major chord into a minor chord. Kind of the same with scales. If I pick the D on the 5th string as the root of the scale and I play a major pentatonic scale going up I play the 5th fret, the 7th fret and the 9th fret on the 5th string before I have to go the the 4th string 7th fret. But if I play a minor pentatonic scale, after playing the D on the 5th fret of the 5th string I have to go the the 4th string 3rd fret next to make it a minor pentatonic scale and that's your flat 3rd!

      Delete
  15. This is brilliant work Rob. You just got a fan!

    Thanks
    Mahesh

    ReplyDelete
  16. Rob, I have been trying to learn the pentatonic scale in different keys for 3 years. I found out that very few people know it thoroughly as they attempt to teach me they get stopped at a certain point. I want to paste your site on facebook but I don't know how, can you tell me how to do that. Thanks for your many exhaustive hours you put into this creation. I am going to look for a donation link for you now. Thank you.

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  17. Rob, on page 6 the fourth is only 1 fret away from the flat 3rd on the low E string, shouldn't it be 2 frets away? Same as the perfect 5th., shouldn't the minor 7th. be 3 frets away? Can you tell me what I'm doing wrong here? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete